Good goals vs bad goals

Good goals vs bad goals

Yes, there are such things as bad goals. How can that be? Take these two examples:

  • Goal 1: Increase sales of my widgets.
  • Goal 2: Increase sales of my widgets by 20% by the end of the year.

Can you tell which one is a good goal and which one is a bad goal? Of course, you can. The second goal is more specific and precise. It gives you something to measure your success by. This is because it uses components of a framework called SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound ). Sometimes it is a little harder to tell a bad goal from a good goal. How about these examples:

  • Goal 1: Increase our email database by 500 recipients by the end of the month.
  • Goal 2: Increase our email database by 5,000 recipients by the end of the month.

These both have measurable goals – both in number and in timing. So, which one is good and which one is bad? It is a trick question. Either one of them could be good, depending on your business. If your business currently has 2,000 names in your email list, maybe 500 new recipients is a good number. However, if your business currently has 100,000 names, 500 is probably a bad goal. Why? Your goals need to be proportional to your current situation. The company with 100,000 names on their email list should set a more worthy goal of adding 5,000 recipients. 

Another consideration is the potential audience pool. If you are in a very niche industry and your email list already contains 90% of the potential pool of possible targets, then perhaps a small goal number is warranted. You also need to match your goal with your potential resources. If you create goals that will require a $1 million marketing budget to achieve, but your budget is only $100,000, you aren’t going to meet those goals. You are setting yourself up for failure if you don’t match your goals with all of these factors.

This may not be what you want to hear, but it is what you need to understand in order to be effective at any type of marketing, let alone the specific niche of content marketing. 

Let’s talk Pinterest

Let’s talk Pinterest

Pinterest logo

No matter what your small business sells, you have a lot of options for your marketing. But have you ever thought about Pinterest as a marketing channel?

Do you think that Pinterest is just for people to post recipes and crafts? Yes, it is used for a lot of that type of content. But that is not all that is pinned on that site. Did you know that the site is the 3rd largest social media platform globally with 322 million users?

You can take advantage of this large audience for your business marketing, particularly if your core audience is female with disposable income. You can use Pinterest for product marketing, but it is also ripe for your content marketing initiatives. Here are some ideas for you to try:

  • Pin links to each of your product pages
  • Create boards for each of your product categories
  • Create ‘how-to’ content on your website and pin those on Pinterest
  • Interact! Follow boards that are relevant to your business or influencers in your industry. Respond to comments on your pins.
  • Pin content from third-party sites that backlink to your site
  • If you are using Pinterest a lot, add your Pin code to printed marketing materials (brochures, business cards)
  • Add Pinterest save buttons to your website

There are a few things you will want to think about when using Pinterest:

  • Have a plan. Don’t just create an account without having an idea of what your content plan will be. Lay out your goals for your account just like you would any other channel.
  • Google does search Pinterest for content, so make sure you are aligning to your SEO goals and using keywords in your pin titles and descriptions
  • If you are linking to your website, make sure you are using ‘pin-worthy’ high quality images
  • Don’t forget to measure your results!

Do you use Pinterest as part of your marketing strategy? Add your tips in the comments!

Loyalty programs: Good customer service or necessary evil?

Loyalty programs: Good customer service or necessary evil?

When it comes to customer loyalty programs, there are two schools of thought. The first is that providing enticements to customers should not be necessary and is a cost without great reward for the company. The second is that offering rewards to your customers is just good business and inspires, well….loyalty.

Over the past few years, rewards program companies have cropped up. Some are better than others. Some understand the nature of customer loyalty and some are just going through the motions. If you will be looking to start a customer loyalty, be sure to do your research before choosing a vendor. Once you start, you are stuck with what you purchased unless  you want to give your customers whiplash and degrade customer loyalty.

So should you employ this type of customer engagement? That depends. You first need to ask yourself some questions:

  • Are you customers repeat customers? If you sell something that people don’t buy very often, having a customer loyalty program probably won’t change that.
  • What reward could you offer that will get your customers to come back? If you own a restaurant with a very high price point, getting a $5 credit after 5 visits is not most likely going to be a reason to come back.
  • Can you use a loyalty program to encourage customer referrals? These types of programs aren’t just to bring current customers back, but can be used to garner new customers as well.

Do you have a customer loyalty program? How is it going? Have you had growing pains? Let us know about in the comments or on social media!